How to Differentiate Between Ceylon and Cassia Cinnamon

I have listed all the differences between the two types of cinnamon. The images also illustrate how to identify the real one.

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Cinnamon is one of those herbs which have been used in the traditional treatments and medicines for a wide range of ailments since ancient times. Among many other remedies and combination, real cinnamon and honey is one of the most useful, effective and easy to use home remedies for several conditions.

But….You need to pay attention to a very important fact that all cinnamon is no good. Most people do not know it.

There is a lot of discussion on the internet on topics like benefits, uses, remedies etc of cinnamon. There is either no or little information about the fact that all cinnamon is not good.

There is fake and real, good and bad, toxic and non-toxic! In this article, I have explained all about this and how to choose the right one.

Cassia Cinnamon

This is called cassia, Chinese or Saigon cinnamon. Some people also call it fake cinnamon. It is produced in countries such as Vietnam, China and Indonesia.

It is very hot and by chewing a piece you can feel the pungent taste sizzle and flame in your mouth. It shares some of the characteristics with real cinnamon like being anti-microbial, anti-fungal, blood regulation etc.

The real problem, however, with the fake cinnamon is that it has a high content of coumarin; in fact, nearly 1200 times higher than found in the real herb.

Taking large amount of coumarin is highly toxic and a prolong use may pose several serious health damages.

According to the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) in Germany, coumarin can damage liver and kidneys if taken for longer periods. In case of sensitive individuals, only a small amount can cause damage.

BfR further advises that cassia cinnamon contains high levels of coumarin and should not, therefore, be eaten.

Cassia Cinnamon is a lot cheaper than the real or Ceylon variety. Most cinnamon sold in the supermarket is the Chinese or Cassia variety.

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Ceylon Cinnamon

This is also called real, sweet or good cinnamon. It is produced in Sri Lanka from the plant called Cinnamomum Zeylanicum.

It is light brown in color and thin and soft in appearance. The sticks are filled like a cigar with several folded layers. The amount of coumarin content is only 0.0004% against 5 % found in Cinnamomum Cassia.

How to Distinguish Between the Two?

In case of ground cinnamon, it is very difficult to distinguish between the two unless you are an expert, especially at sniffing spices. There is no guarantee that the result will be one hundred percent accurate.

However, in case of sticks, it is easier to differentiate between the two. The following table and pictures highlight some of the differences which shall help you to choose the correct type.

Ceylon Cinnamon Cassian Cinnamon
Soft texture, easily broken Hard texture Not easily broken
Soft and Sweet aromatic Pungent and very spicy flavor
Coumarin content 0.0004% Coumarin content 5%
Generally safe Toxic if taken in case of prolonged use
Expensive and not found everywhere A lot cheaper and found in supermarket
Native to Sri Lanka Native to China, India, Vietnam, Indonesia
Light brown in color Dark Brown or reddish in color
Soft in appearance Rough in appearance
Several folds of layer like a cigar only inward folded. Empty cavity

Most bottled or packaged ground cinnamon does not mention its type or origin. It is, therefore, difficult to ascertain its type and origin or the country or plant.

The best course is to identify the sticks and make sure that you are buying the Ceylon variety. Once you get hold of the real “thing” , use your blender to crush it into powder.

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7 Health Benefits of Cinnamon You Need to Know

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Once upon a time, cinnamon was more valuable than gold. And while these days, most of us would rather get our hands on 24 karats instead of 24 ounces – a gold bar over a brown stick – this bark-cum-spice has just as much bite as it does bark. The potential health benefits of cinnamon could be stated as nothing short of astonishing.

To help us sort myth from fact, we’ve enlisted the help of several health experts to give us their two cents on one of our favorite spices.

7 Proven Health Benefits of Cinnamon

1. Cinnamon may help treat Type 2 diabetes.

While it’s true that there’s no cure for Type 2 diabetes, cinnamon can be an effective tool in managing the disease.

According to Lori Kenyon Farley, a Certified Nutrition Consultant specializing in wellness, fitness and anti-aging and one of the experts behind Project Juice, cinnamon can help manage this disease in two different ways. “It can reduce blood pressure and have a positive effect on blood markers for those with Type 2 diabetes,” she explains. Cinnamon can also reduce insulin resistance, which, Farley explains, “has been shown to lower fasting blood sugar levels by up to 29%, which can reduce the instance of Type 2 diabetes.”

Shane Ellison, MS, a medicinal chemist and founder of the Sugar Detox, explains how exactly this works. “(Cinnamon) works directly on the muscle cells to force them to remove sugar from the bloodstream, where it is converted to energy,” he says. “It’s even shown to work better than most prescription meds.”

The key is in increasing insulin sensitivity in the body, a sensitivity that, while present at birth for those without type 1 diabetes, slowly decreases as we age and consume more sugar. As a result, sugar floats around in the blood, causing diabetes and other health problems. “Cinnamon, which is completely non-toxic, repairs the receptors so they are once again responsive to insulin,” Ellison explains. “In time, sugar levels normalize due to an increase in insulin sensitivity.”

Add to this the fact that cinnamon has a naturally sweet taste that is devoid of sugar, making it a great addition to foods like plain yogurt as a dessert or snack, and you’ll soon see why we suggest it as a staple for the pantries of those with Type 2 diabetes.

2. Cinnamon can lower your bad cholesterol (or LDL).

Even if you do not suffer from diabetes, you may want to include cinnamon in your diet for many of the same reasons as those who do.

As Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR, the holistic nutritionist for Kate Naumes ND Holistic Wellness in Dallas explains, the positive impact on Type 2 diabetes symptoms is due to a number of factors, notably “improving serum glucose, lowering fasting blood glucose, and reducing triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol.” These are all benefits that can help even those not suffering from diabetes, including those with hereditary cholesterol worries or problems.

“(Cinnamon) also raises HDL (the “good”) cholesterol,” she explains. HDL cholesterol helps remove LDL cholesterol from the body.

And that’s not all. “Regular intake of cinnamon may also help to mitigate the effects of high-fat meals by slowing the increase in blood sugar post-meal,” says Parikh. This means that when cinnamon is added to your diet, the effects of occasional high-fat choices may not be quite as detrimental to your health as they would otherwise be.

3. Cinnamon has antifungal, antibacterial, and even antiviral properties.

Cinnamon has been proven to fight fungal, bacterial, and viral elements in foods, thus preventing spoilage. It’s no surprise that in the Middle Ages, when food spoilage was far more frequent due to lack of refrigeration, many recipes, both sweet and savory, were flavored with the spice.

But these properties of cinnamon do not extend merely to the foods cinnamon seasons. Consumers of cinnamon can benefit from these properties as well, according to our experts, who say cinnamon can be used as part of a treatment for anything from lung problems to the common cold.

Denise Baron, a wellness educator and director of Ayurveda for Modern Living explains that cinnamon can help with all sorts of lung congestion issues. “It helps clear up mucus and encourages circulation,” she explains, thus lending its powers to everything from a simple seasonal cough to bronchitis, when used in tandem with other remedies.

But perhaps the most surprising use of cinnamon is in combatting viruses, and not just the common cold. “Research shows that cinnamon extract may help fight the HIV virus by preventing the virus from entering cells,” says Parikh. “Therefore, cinnamon extract could potentially contribute to the management of HIV.”

4. Cinnamon can help treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases are two neurological conditions that, for the moment, are incurable. An enormous part of treating these diseases is therefore in symptom management, and this can be boosted with the addition of cinnamon to a regular regime.

“Cinnamon has been shown to help neurons and improve motor function in those suffering from Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s,” explains Farley. These contributions can help sufferers of these two diseases continue their regular routines with far less impediment.

5. Cinnamon may have anti-carcinogenic properties.

Many superfoods are attributed with anti-carcinogenic properties, but it’s important not to jump from super food to super power. Parikh explains why it’s important not to get carried away.

“Evidence suggests that cinnamon may have anti-carcinogenic effects as well, although the research thus far is limited to animal studies,” she says. “These experiments demonstrate that cinnamon extract slows the growth of cancer cells and induces cancerous cell death.”

If these properties do extend to humans, then cinnamon may in fact be able to slow growth and kill cancerous cells. And even if these properties do not extend to a cure or treatment for cancer in humans, other characteristics of cinnamon, including the presence of antioxidants and free radicals, can contribute to its possible anti-carcinogenic effects.

6. Cinnamon has anti-inflammatory properties.

Consumption of cinnamon can reduce both systemic and specific inflammation. The former is particularly important in the Western world, according to Parekh.

She says that in the West, “Systemic inflammation is a prominent problem that has led to the rise in chronic disease.” By adding cinnamon to a regular diet, this systemic inflammation can be reduced significantly.”

Specific inflammation reduction means that consumption of cinnamon can help treat certain types of pain and headaches, as well as arthritis pain. It plays a double role in this particular type of pain, according to Baron, as cinnamon can also boost circulation. “With circulation problems such as Raynaud’s syndrome or arthritis, this helps stimulate and push circulation to the joints,” she explains.

7. Cinnamon can help manage PCOS.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a problem with numerous symptoms that need to be managed, and cinnamon can be a key element of this management due to a number of characteristics.

First would be the management of insulin resistance in women with PCOS, which can contribute to weight gain. “A recent pilot study found that cinnamon reduced insulin resistance in women with PCOS,” explains Parekh, extending cinnamon’s recommended consumption from diabetes sufferers to anyone with an insulin resistance problem.

“Cinnamon can also help mitigate heavy menstrual bleeding associated with common conditions of female health, such as endometriosis, menorrhagia, and uterine fibroids.”

It’s possible we’re just brushing the surface here. After all, Chinese medicine and Ayurveda have long revered cinnamon for its near superpowers, using it to treat things such as colds, indigestion and cramps, not to mention for its anti-clotting properties as well as attributes for cognitive function and memory. These societies also believed cinnamon could improve energy, vitality and circulation. It’s no wonder we’ve dubbed it a superfood!

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Why is Cinnamon So Good for You?

How does such a little spice have so much power?

Many of cinnamon’s fantastic properties come from one substance, something called cinnamaldehyde, which is naturally present in cinnamon. According to Parikh, cinnamaldehyde is the source many of the antifungal and antibacterial properties that make cinnamon such a great addition to your diet.

But that’s not all. “Cinnamon’s high concentration of antioxidants can help protect the body from damage from free radicals and reduce inflammation, reducing risk of cancer and other diseases,” explains Farley.

The combination of cinnamaldehyde, antioxidants and cinnamon’s high fiber content are some of the characteristics that lend it its incredible positive effects on the human body.

How to Include Cinnamon in Your Diet

Even with all this evidence pointing to the wonders of cinnamon, we are absolutely not advocating you start guzzling it – it has been found to be toxic in large doses.

We are, however, wholeheartedly encouraging a little pinch (or stick) here and there in places you might otherwise have overlooked (in your tea or coffee, added to savory dishes, etc.) – if not for your overall health, for its undeniably enchanting aroma and flavor.

And while we all have fell victim to the irresistible smells wafting through an otherwise bleak airport experience, this does not make Cinnabon a free-for-all. Not only is it much better to use cinnamon in healthy recipes, but you’re going to want to source your cinnamon somewhere you trust for several reasons.

What Kind of Cinnamon Should I Use?

Not all cinnamons were created equal, so be careful what you buy.

“Nearly all the cinnamon in the grocery stores and health food stores is a cousin of true cinnamon,” explains Christina Major, a MS Holistic Nutritionist and Herbalist and the Health Recovery Expert of Crystal Holistic Health.

Cinnamomum cassia, or Chinese cinnamon, has a very similar flavor and color, but it does not have the same health benefits,” she explains. “Only Cinnamomum verum provides the health benefits, and this is an expensive spice that is often illicitly substituted with Cinnamomum cassia.”

When you are perusing the supermarket shelves, you’ll likely see Cinnamomum cassia sold as Chinese or Cassia cinnamon, whereas Cinnamomum verum will be sold as Ceylon cinnamon. According to our experts, you should opt for the latter.

If you do have Cassia cinnamon on your shelf already, you can try integrating it into your diet as well, but bear in mind a few important notes.

You likely will not find that the same benefits outlined with regards to Ceylon cinnamon hold true with Cassia. “That’s why most supplements and home remedies don’t work,” explains Major. “There isn’t enough active ingredient, because the manufacturer didn’t use the right cinnamon.”

Farley also warns that the Cassia variety should be consumed in very small doses. “Not more than 2 tsp. per day,” she suggests, “Since it has a higher concentration of courmarin, which can be harmful in large doses.” Courmarin can cause liver toxicity and have blood-thinning properties, so be sure to talk to your doctor before adding this or any sort of cinnamon to your diet if you are on blood thinners or liver medication.

If you’d like to give a small amount of cinnamon a try, here’s a good starting point.  If you prefer to buy in bulk to save money, click here for 1lb of cinnamon.

How Much Cinnamon Should I Eat?

Once you’ve got your hands on some true Ceylon cinnamon, the recommended dosage, according to the U.S. Department of Health, is up to 6 grams daily for 6 weeks or fewer.

“I would suggest a week rest after the 6 weeks, before beginning again,” says Farley. “Turmeric can be taken during the rest week since it has similar benefits.”

You can also reduce your cinnamon consumption to 5 days a week without a rest week, says Parehk, though she – and we – urge anyone starting a new supplement regimen to consult with a qualified practitioner first and to be very careful of over-consumption of cinnamon, no matter which variety you have. Overconsumption of cinnamon or even a rapid increase of consumption of cinnamon can have some adverse effects.

One, explains Dizon, is that cinnamon’s anti-bacterial properties do not distinguish between good or bad bacteria in the gut, meaning that you could find yourself facing some cinnamon-related digestive issues. “Incorporate fermented foods to replenish your stomach with good bacteria,” she suggests.

Our experts also warn against incorporating too much cinnamon into your diet if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or have a heavy menstrual cycle. If any of these things apply to you, please see a medical professional before adding cinnamon to your diet.

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How Should I Add Cinnamon to My Diet?

Cinnamon can be purchased in several forms, including ground powder, cinnamon sticks, cinnamon bark oil, or even capsules.

Jane Dizon, a nurse and health and fitness enthusiast behind Health and Fitness, has a few suggestions for how to add cinnamon to your diet. “You could add half to one teaspoon of cinnamon powder to your coffee, or sprinkle some on your fruit platter. It’s also great with baked sweet potatoes, oatmeals and apple cider.”

And cinnamon doesn’t always have to be used alone. “You can combine ginger and cardamom with cinnamon if you have a sluggish digestive system,” explains Baron.

You don’t even have to eat your cinnamon to take advantage of it. Dizon suggests cinnamon-scented candles to boost brain function, and Baron makes a homemade toothpaste with cinnamon, nutmeg, baking soda and cinnamon oil. She also suggests a cinnamon and oatmeal face mask for acne.

Here are just a few of our favorite recipes for including cinnamon in your diet:

What are your favorite ways to eat cinnamon?


Source: organicauthority.com

The Health Benefits of Turmeric

More than just an ingredient in curry, this bright orange spice also boasts several health-boosting properties. So, why is turmeric so good for you?

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Turmeric (curcuma longa) is extensively cultivated in the tropics and the root is widely used in cooking. Turmeric has a deep, golden-orange colour and looks similar to ginger. It is usually boiled, sun-dried and then ground into a powder. It has a peppery, warm flavour and a mild fragrance. Turmeric is the main ingredient in curry powder and can be used as a colouring agent. It has long been used in both cooking and colouring. Turmeric has also played an important role in traditional Eastern cultures and Ayurvedic medicine. Much of its new-found popularity is due to its therapeutic properties.

Nutritional highlights

We are frequently told that colourful plant foods are good for our health because of their phytochemical properties (plant pigments) and turmeric is no different. It has a range of health promoting benefits due to curcumin, the yellow pigment. As several metabolic diseases and age-related degenerative disorders are closely associated with oxidative processes in the body, the use of herbs and spices as a source of antioxidants to combat oxidation warrants further attention.

The potential health benefits of curcumin include better regulation of inflammation. It is used in the treatment of numerous inflammatory conditions for its anti-inflammatory effects. Curcumin is thought to slow down the inflammatory pathway, although this line of research is being continued.

Turmeric’s anti-inflammatory properties have been compared to those of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Clinical trials have found it to be more effective than a placebo for relieving pain and swelling in people with osteo and rheumatoid arthritis. However, more well-designed clinical studies are needed to determine and document the efficacy of curcumin and combination products in patients taking NSAIDS to treat osteoarthritis.

Another active ingredient in turmeric is turmerone. Although far less is known about turmerone compared to curcumin, it can be obtained from whole ground turmeric. Some studies suggest tumerone can support cognitive performance due to its neuroprotective properties.

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Potential issues and benefits

It is important to note that the amount of curcumin in turmeric as we buy it can vary, depending on species, growing conditions, harvesting etc. Most of the studies use turmeric extracts that contain mostly curcumin alone, with dosages usually exceeding 1 gram per day. It would be very difficult to reach these levels just using the turmeric spice in cooking, although it is clearly a welcome addition to the diet.

In addition to delivering antioxidants and other properties, herbs and spices can be used in recipes to partially or wholly replace salt, sugar and added saturated fat in, for example, marinades and dressings, stir-fry dishes, casseroles, soups, curries and Mediterranean-style cooking.

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How to select and store

Turmeric is available as a ground powder and, like ginger, is available as the fresh rhizome bought in food shops. Fresh turmeric should be free of dark spots and be crisp. It may be stored in the fridge where it will keep for a month. Turmeric powder should be stored in a cool dark, dry place where it will keep for up to a year.

Since its deep orange colour can easily stain, avoid getting it on clothing. To avoid a permanent stain, quickly wash the affected area with soap and water.

Find out more about the benefits of Turmeric on the Sundara Botanical website

Source: BBC Good Food

9 Ways Cinnamon Can Benefit Your Skin

Cinnamon grows abundantly in Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India and other Asian countries and people out there have been using cinnamon for various medicinal purposes including for skin disorders.

One great thing about cinnamon is there are so many ways to use it – cinnamon oil, powder, mask, etc.

Cinnamon is proving to be a spice that not only adds flavor to various dishes but can also cure many infections and diseases.

There are several researches being conducted all over the world about the benefits of cinnamon for diabetes, hair loss, cholesterol, memory, arthritis, skin and more.

A topical application of cinnamon with honey is said to get rid of pimples, ringworms, eczema and other skin infections.

Cinnamon essential oil is often used in aromatherapy and it combines well with lemon, lavender, cardamom, geranium and rosemary essential oils. Cinnamon essential oil can be used as a massage oil to cure arthritis, general pain and such.

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Cinnamon Benefits for the Skin

Cinnamon has been used for centuries in traditional medicines in Asian cultures-Chinese and Indian. Among the various benefits which cinnamon offers, one of the most important is its role in maintaining healthy skin.

In addition to this, it can also help remedy various skin related diseases and infections.

Thus, cinnamon can be used in multifarious various to improve your skin.

Here are some of the benefits of cinnamon for skin –

1. Plumps Skin

Cinnamon is said to improve fine lines by plumping the skin.
This means that using cinnamon can stimulate blood vessels and bring blood to the surface of the skin. Use a mixture of 3 drops essential oil of cinnamon and 2 tbsp olive oil or petroleum jelly. Apply this mixture to fine lines on the skin, taking care to avoid the eyes.

The skin soon plumps out and fine lines become less visible. This can even be done to plump up lips and can be used as an alternate to lip gloss.

2. Cleanses the Scalp

Cinnamon can also be used to nourish the scalp. Make a paste using 1 tsp ground cinnamon, ¼ tsp warm olive oil and 1 tbsp honey. Massage this into the scalp and leave on for 15 minutes.

Wash off after this using a normal shampoo. Cinnamon acts like an exfoliating agent to stimulate the scalp and provide nourishment to hair follicles.

3. Treatment for Eczema

Eczema is a condition in which skin gets  inflamed and irritated. A large number of medical conditions are grouped under the term ‘eczema’. The most common type of eczema is atopic dermatitis, which is an inherited condition. The exact cause of eczema is unknown, but the most important cause is an overactive response by the body’s immune system against an irritant or allergen.

Eczema can be a very irritating skin condition that leaves behind light colored patches.

Some people have found that using 1 tsp cinnamon and 1 tsp honey on these patches could provide relief.

However, this paste must not be used on the face for it can cause irritation. You are advised to perform a skin test before using cinnamon paste on the skin.

4. Treatment for Acne

Cinnamon is said to help with treatment of acne and pimples. Mix 1 tbsp cinnamon powder and 3 tbsp honey and apply this on pimples. Leave this paste overnight or for 20 minutes before washing with warm water.

Acne scars could dry out and skin could get rejuvenated.

This paste can also declog pores and bring oxygen and blood to the surface. However, this must not be used more than once a week since it could cause skin irritation.

5. Antiseptic

Cinnamon has antiseptic properties. If you have an open cut or wound, just dust a pinch of cinnamon over it. Bacteria will be killed and the wound heals faster.

A large number of studies have determined the anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties of cinnamon.

As far back as 1978, a study reported the anti-fungal effects of o-methoxycinnamaldehyde from cinnamon. It was reported that this compound inhibited the growth and toxin production by the mycotoxin producing fungii.

It completely inhibited the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus at 100 microgram/ml and Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus versicolor at 200 microgram/ml.

A comparative analysis of the bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity of 13 essential oils showed that the True Cinnamon bark oil had the highest anti-microbial activity.

It was particularly effective against resistant strains. The study was exhaustive and analysed the effect of the oils against 55 different bacterial strains. Thus, cinnamon can effectively be used to eliminate various bacterial strains.

Another study has shown that Cinnamon essential oils can help combat the infectious agents which are resistant to the traditional antibiotics, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, it was found that Cinnamon oils are much more effective as compared to olive and paraffin oils in fighting Multi-Drug Resistant S. aureus.

Thus, cinnamon oils can be used to fight Staphylococcus infections.

Thus, the anti-microbial properties of Cinnamon and its oils have been definitively proven in numerous studies. Since sepsis is an inflammation caused by infection, it can be inhibited by using Cinnamon extracts and oils. Sepsis is a potentially fatal condition which might result in septic shock and multi-organ failure.

Thus, Cinnamon can offer a very simple cure to septic infections.

6. Reduce signs of aging

Cinnamon used on the skin seems to increase collagen levels for up to six hours after it is applied. Breakdown of collagen causes the skin to lose elasticity and increases signs of aging.

When cinnamon extracts were used as an inducer for skin fibroblast cells, there was an increase in the levels of collagen protein, without any cytotoxic effects.

Thus, cinnamon can act as a safe agent to promote collagen biosynthesis. By carrying out experiments like liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance, it was determined that the active agent responsible for this up regulation of collagen is cinnamaldehyde.

The intracellular pathway for the synthesis of collagen involves a receptor known as the Insulin-like Growth factor-I (IGF-I). It was observed that upon cinnamon extract treatment, there was an increased level of phosphorylation of this receptor.

This indicates that when cinnamon treatment was given, the biosynthetic pathway of collagen synthesis was activated to greater extent. An enhanced expression level of the various proteins involved downstream of the receptor was also observed due to the cinnamon treatment.Thus, cinnamon can be used as an anti-aging agent.

In a nutshell — Cinnamon seems to increase collage expression on the skin through cinnamaldehyde, its main chemical component. This is able to activate growth factors IGF-1 and improve collagen expression. Topically cinnamon creams could be used.

7. To soften and soothe dry and dead skin

Cinnamon extracts and powder act as very good exfoliants an can be used to remove dead skin cells. This helps to restore the shine and suppleness of skin. Cinnamon can be used in combination with sea salt, almond oil, honey and olive oil.

To soften rough skin, we can take advantage of the anti-oxidant properties of cinnamon. In a study carried out in 1998, the anti-oxidant properties of Cinnamon extracts were evaluated. It was was observed that Cinnamon extracts have highly potent anti-oxidant properties.

To treat roughened feet, a foot bath consisting of lemon juice, olive oil, whole milk, water and ground Cinnamon can be prepared. A treatment for 15 mins can effectively soften skin and make the feet smooth.

8. To improve complexion

Another major benefit of using Cinnamon is that it helps to enhance skin complexion. This is due to the anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties of cinnamon. But I have to add, this is not scientifically established.

For this, a face mask consisting a banana puree, yoghurt, ground Cinnamon and lemon juice can be prepared and applied onto the skin. It should be left until it has dried and then it can be washed with warm water. This helps to improve skin quality and as well as complexion.

Cinnamon is a highly beneficial spice which can be used to ensure various benefits for the skin. It helps to prevent and fight skin infections, eczema and also improves the quality, texture and complexion of skin. Thus, cinnamon powder can act as a very simple solution for various skin related problems.

9. As a massage Oil

Cinnamon oil improves blood circulation. By using this essential oil for massages, the nutrients in the skin increases and this improves the tone of the skin. Cinnamon oil made from the leaves must only be used on the skin. Oil made using cinnamon bark usually causes allergic reactions.

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Other benefits to the skin

Cinnamon included in foods can also improve skin tone. For example, add a tablespoon cinnamon to various foods in a day can provide us with a good source of fiber. This eliminates waste products from the body. Flushing out toxins prevents them from clogging the skin and improves skin tone.

Drinking a smoothie with a dash of cinnamon powder can fight against bacteria which cause acne and other skin conditions.

Cinnamon powder and cinnamon oil have been found to offer anti-parasitic, antifungal, antiseptic and antibacterial properties according to animal and test tube studies.

Cinnamon could be used to fight vaginal and oral yeast infections caused by the Candida Albicans fungus. It could also be used to get rid of head lice.

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Ways to use Cinnamon for Skin

Here are some ways to use cinnamon and other ingredients for the skin. Wherever I mention cinnamon for oral use, please consider it as Ceylon cinnamon.

Cinnamon-Nutmeg Body Wash

If you are feeling fatigued, you can try this body wash to recharge your body and make you feel fresh and look younger. Make this inexpensive, rejuvenating wash using 6 teaspoons each of ground nutmeg and ground cinnamon. Filter this, pour it into a warm bath and soak in this until the water cools.

Use the same water to wash your face too. Soak for 10 minutes a day and feel the difference.

Cinnamon Scrub

Combine together the following ingredients and use them as a scrub.

  • Cinnamon essential oil – 2-3 drops (optional)
  • Ground coffee – 2 cups
  • Cinnamon powder – 1 tsp
  • Sea Salt or raw sugar – ½ cup
  • Almond oil or any other light essential oil – 2-3 tbsp

Cinnamon-Honey-Nutmeg Face Mask

This face mask can be used to treat acne. It can be used twice a week but with caution. The benefits are got from all three products. Honey offers antimicrobial benefits and can fight acne caused by microbes.

It is also soothing to the skin and is a natural antioxidant. Nutmeg reduces inflammation and redness caused by acne. It can dry out acne and is a safe topical acne treatment similar to salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide.

Cinnamon can dry out pimples and plump the skin by bringing oxygen and blood to the surface and unclog and open pores by removing excess oil from the skin’s surface.

For the mask, mix together:

  • Cinnamon – 1tbsp
  • Raw organic honey – ¼ cup
  • Nutmeg – 2 tbsp

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Precautions while using cinnamon

Use Ceylon and not Cassia Cinnamon for oral use. This is because Cassia has high % of coumarin which can cause harm.

Cinnamon oil offers many health benefits but used in concentrated form, it can also cause allergic reactions like swelling of the skin, hives, mouth sores and skin irritations in some people.

Hence, people are advised to do a patch test before using cinnamon oil or to use cinnamon bark powder instead for skin infections. The irritation is often caused by eugenol and cinnamaldehyde present in cinnamon oil.

This could cause convulsions and must be avoided during pregnancy.

It could also be an irritant or a dermal toxin sometimes. Some people could experience allergic reactions to cinnamon oil or even develop contact dermatitis.

Source: thesuperfoods.net