Honey and Cinnamon: A Powerful Cure or a Big, Fat Lie?

Honey and cinnamon are two natural ingredients with multiple health benefits.

Some people claim that when these two ingredients are combined, they can cure almost any disease.

While there is some evidence that each has some medicinal uses, some claims about the mixture of honey and cinnamon seem too good to be true.

This article reviews the benefits of honey and cinnamon, separating fact from fiction.

Honey and Cinnamon: Natural Ingredients for Better Health

cinnamon_honey_small

Honey is a sweet liquid produced by bees. It has been used for centuries as both a food and a medicine.

Today it is most commonly used in cooking and baking, or as a sweetener in beverages.

Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the bark of the Cinnamomum tree.

People harvest and dry its bark, which curls into what are commonly known as cinnamon sticks. You can purchase cinnamon as whole sticks, ground into a powder or as an extract.

Both honey and cinnamon have multiple health benefits on their own. However, some people assume that combining the two is even more beneficial.

In 1995, a Canadian tabloid published an article that provided a long list of ailments that could be cured by a mixture of honey and cinnamon.

Since then, bold claims about the honey and cinnamon combo have multiplied.

These two ingredients do have plenty of health applications, but not all the claims about the combination are backed by science.

Bottom Line: Honey and cinnamon are ingredients that can be used as both food and medicine. However, not all of the claims about honey and cinnamon are supported by research.

Science-Backed Benefits of Cinnamon

105daa553d7e0062.jpg

Cinnamon is a popular spice in cooking and baking that can also be taken as a supplement.

There are two major types:

  • Cassia cinnamon: This variety, also known as Chinese cinnamon, is the most popular type in supermarkets. It is less expensive, but of lower quality than Ceylon cinnamon.
  • Ceylon cinnamon: This type is also known as “true cinnamon.” It is much harder to find than Cassia cinnamon and it has a slightly sweeter flavor.

Cinnamon’s health benefits are linked to active compounds in its essential oil.

The most well-studied cinnamon compound is cinnamaldehyde. This is also what gives cinnamon its spicy flavor and aroma (1).

Here are some of cinnamon’s most impressive benefits:

  • May reduce inflammation: Long-term inflammation increases the risk of chronic disease. Studies show cinnamon may help reduce inflammation (2, 3).
  • May help treat neurodegenerative diseases: A few test-tube studies suggest that cinnamon might help slow the progression of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. These results need to be confirmed in human studies (4, 5, 6, 7, 8).
  • May help protect against cancer: A few animal and test-tube studies found that cinnamon helps prevent the growth and reproduction of cancer cells. However, these results need to be confirmed with human studies (9, 10).

Some have also suggested that cinnamon may be a natural treatment for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and food poisoning.

However, there is not sufficient evidence to support these claims.

Bottom Line: Cinnamon is one of the healthiest spices in the world. Both types of cinnamon have health benefits, but Ceylon cinnamon is the better choice if you are going to consume it on a regular basis.

Science-Backed Benefits of Honey

642x361_IMAGE_2_Can_You_Really_Use_Honey_and_Cinnamon_for_Weight_Loss

In addition to being a healthier alternative to table sugar, honey has several medicinal uses.

However, it’s important to note that not all types are equal.

Most of the benefits of honey are associated with active compounds that are most concentrated in high-quality, unfiltered honey.

Here are some of honey’s health benefits that have been supported by science:

  • May be an effective cough suppressant: One study found that honey was more effective at suppressing nighttime coughs than dextromethorphan, the active ingredient in most cough syrups. Yet more research is needed (11).
  • A powerful treatment for wounds and burns: A review of six studies found that applying honey to the skin is a powerful treatment for wounds (12, 13).

Honey is also thought to be a sleep aid, a memory booster, a natural aphrodisiac, a treatment for yeast infections and a natural way to reduce plaque on your teeth, but these claims aren’t supported by science.

Bottom Line: Honey has several health benefits connected to its antioxidant capacity and antibacterial properties.

Both Honey and Cinnamon May Benefit Certain Health Conditions

honey-and-cinnamon-miracle-combination-with-powerful-healing-properties1

The theory is that if both honey and cinnamon can help on their own, then combining the two can have an even stronger effect.

What is known is that there are several similarities between the health benefits of honey and cinnamon. Both are beneficial in the following areas:

Honey and Cinnamon May Reduce the Risk of Heart Disease

Special-Focus-On-Raw-Honey-And-Ceylon-Cinnamon

A mixture of honey and cinnamon has the potential to lower your risk of heart disease.

That’s because it may help reverse several health signs that significantly raise that risk.

These include elevated levels of “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high triglyceride levels.

High blood pressure and low levels of “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are additional factors that can increase your risk of the disease.

Interestingly, honey and cinnamon may positively affect all of these.

Studies have shown that consuming honey lowers “bad” LDL cholesterol by 6–11% and lowers triglyceride levels by as much as 11%. Honey may also increase “good” HDL cholesterol by about 2% (14, 15, 16, 17, 18).

A meta-analysis found that a daily dose of cinnamon lowered total cholesterol by an average of 16 mg/dl, LDL “bad” cholesterol by 9 mg/dl and triglycerides by 30 mg/dl. There was also a slight increase in “good” HDL cholesterol levels (19).

While they have not been studied together, cinnamon and honey have individually been shown to cause modest decreases in blood pressure. However, this research was in animals (2, 20, 21, 22).

Additionally, both foods are rich in antioxidants, which have multiple benefits for the heart. Polyphenol antioxidants improve blood flow to the heart and prevent blood clots, lowering your risk of heart attack and stroke (20).

Honey and cinnamon might also help prevent heart disease because they both reduce inflammation. Chronic inflammation is a major factor in the development of heart disease (2, 23, 24).

The Honey and Cinnamon Combo Is Useful for Healing Wounds

Wooden-honey-stick-and-cinnamon-sticks-750x400

Both honey and cinnamon have well-documented healing properties that could be useful for treating skin infections when the mixture is applied to the skin.

Honey and cinnamon both have the ability to fight bacteria and decrease inflammation. These are two factors that are very important when it comes to healing the skin (12).

Applied to the skin, honey has been used successfully to treat burns. It can also treat diabetic foot ulcers, which are a very serious complication of diabetes (12, 25).

Cinnamon may provide some additional benefit for healing wounds, due to its strong antibacterial properties.

Diabetic foot ulcers have a high risk of becoming infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A test-tube study found that cinnamon oil helps protect against antibiotic-resistant bacteria (26, 27).

However, this study used cinnamon oil, which is much more concentrated than the powdered cinnamon you can find at the grocery store. There is no evidence that powdered cinnamon would have the same effect.

Honey and Cinnamon May Be Good for Diabetics

Honey-And-Cinnamon-For-Diabetes

It is well documented that consuming cinnamon on a regular basis is good for diabetics. It may also help prevent diabetes (28, 29, 30).

Numerous studies have shown that cinnamon decreases fasting blood sugar levels in diabetics (28, 29, 31, 32, 33).

One of the ways cinnamon lowers blood sugar is by increasing insulin sensitivity. Cinnamon makes the cells more sensitive to the hormone insulin and helps sugar move from the blood into the cells (30).

Honey also has some potential benefits for diabetics. Studies have shown that honey has less impact on blood sugar levels than sugar (34).

Additionally, honey may lower “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides in diabetics, while raising “good” HDL cholesterol levels (14, 16).

Honey and cinnamon may be relatively healthier than table sugar for sweetening your tea. However, honey is still high in carbs, so diabetics should use it in moderation.

Honey and Cinnamon Are Packed With Antioxidants

Both honey and cinnamon are excellent sources of antioxidants, which have multiple benefits for your health (35, 36, 37).

Antioxidants are substances that protect you from unstable molecules called free radicals, which can damage your cells.

Honey is rich in phenol antioxidants, which have been associated with a decreased risk of heart disease (38).

Cinnamon is also an antioxidant powerhouse. When compared to other spices, cinnamon ranks at the very top for antioxidant content (1, 39, 40).

Consuming honey and cinnamon together can give you a powerful dose of antioxidants.

Bottom Line: There are some health conditions that the combo of honey and cinnamon may help. The combo might improve your heart health, treat wounds and may be useful for diabetics.

Unproven Claims About Honey and Cinnamon

1296x728_HEADER_Using_Honey_and_Cinnamon_for_acne copy

The concept of combining two powerful ingredients to create an even more powerful remedy makes sense.

However, there are no direct studies showing that the combination of honey and cinnamon creates a miracle substance that cures multiple ailments.

Additionally, many of the proposed uses for honey and cinnamon have not been backed by science.

Here are some of the popular but unproven claims about honey and cinnamon:

  • They can fight allergy symptoms: Some studies have been done on honey’s ability to reduce allergy symptoms, but the evidence is weak (41, 42).
  • Honey and cinnamon can cure the common cold: Honey and cinnamon have strong antibacterial properties, but most colds are caused by viruses.
  • Honey and cinnamon can treat acne: While the antibacterial properties of both ingredients can be beneficial for acne-prone skin, studies have not explored the mixture’s effectiveness for treating acne.
  • They are a natural weight loss tool: A few studies suggest that replacing sugar with honey contributes to less weight gain, but there is no evidence that honey and cinnamon will help you lose weight (43, 44).
  • Rubbing the mixture on your joints can relieve arthritis pain: Honey and cinnamon do reduce inflammation, but there is no proof that applying these foods to your skin can reduce inflammation in the joints.
  • Honey and cinnamon can calm digestive issues: There are claims that honey can coat your stomach and both ingredients will fight bacterial infections in the gut. However, this isn’t backed by research.

Bottom Line: Honey and cinnamon are both beneficial for your health, but there is no evidence that combining them will multiply their effects.

How to Use Honey and Cinnamon to Improve Your Health

honey-cinamon

The best way to use honey in your diet is as a replacement for sugar.

Make sure you purchase unfiltered honey, since most of the highly processed honey on supermarket shelves doesn’t have any health benefits.

Use honey with caution though, since it is still high in sugar — just “less bad” than regular sugar.

You should also be aware that cinnamon contains a compound called coumarin, which can be toxic in large doses. Coumarin content is much higher in Cassia cinnamon than in Ceylon cinnamon (45, 46).

It is best to purchase Ceylon cinnamon, but if you are going to consume the Cassia variety, limit your daily intake to 1/2 teaspoon (0.5–2 grams). You can safely consume up to 1 teaspoon (about 5 grams) of Ceylon cinnamon per day (45).

To use honey and cinnamon to treat a skin infection, mix honey with a small amount of cinnamon oil and apply it directly to the infected skin.

Bottom Line: Honey and cinnamon can be eaten or applied to the skin. Purchase high-quality unfiltered honey and Ceylon cinnamon if you want to get the most benefits.

Take Home Message

240_F_69250480_oRQpFZRGarPMaiMEkGtSfknFj8nJBPwp

Honey and cinnamon both have multiple health benefits individually, many of which are backed by science.

Both of these ingredients are especially useful for improving your heart health and healing infections.

However, there is no scientific evidence to show that combining honey and cinnamon creates a miracle cure.

Source: healthline.com

Advertisements

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar and Fights Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease characterized by abnormally high blood sugar.

If poorly controlled, it can lead to complications like heart disease, kidney disease and nerve damage (1).

Treatment often includes medications and insulin injections, but many people are also interested in foods that can help lower blood sugar.

One such example is cinnamon, a commonly used spice that’s added to sweet and savory dishes around the world.It provides many health benefits, including the ability to lower blood sugar and help manage diabetes.

This article tells you everything you need to know about cinnamon and its effects on blood sugar control and diabetes.

What Is Cinnamon?

Cinnamon is an aromatic spice derived from the bark of several species of Cinnamomum trees.

While you may associate cinnamon with rolls or breakfast cereals, it has actually been used for thousands of years in traditional medicine and food preservation.

To obtain cinnamon, the inner bark of Cinnamomum trees must be removed.

The bark then undergoes a drying process that causes it to curl up and yield cinnamon sticks, or quills, which can be further processed into powdered cinnamon.

Several different varieties of cinnamon are sold in the US, and they are typically categorized by two different types:

  • Ceylon: Also called “true cinnamon,” it’s the most expensive type.
  • Cassia: Less expensive and found in most food products containing cinnamon.

While both types are sold as cinnamon, there are important differences between the two, which will be discussed later in this article.

Summary: Cinnamon is made from the dried bark of Cinnamomum trees and is generally categorized into two varieties.

show-images-cinnamon-scoop

It Contains Antioxidants That Provide Many Health Benefits

A quick glance at cinnamon’s nutrition facts may not lead you to believe that it’s a superfood (2).

But while it doesn’t contain a lot of vitamins or minerals, it does contain large amounts of antioxidants, which give it its health benefits.

In fact, one group of scientists compared the antioxidant content of 26 different herbs and spices and concluded that cinnamon had the second highest amount of antioxidants among them (after cloves) (3).

Antioxidants are important because they help the body reduce oxidative stress, a type of damage to cells, which is caused by free radicals.One study showed that consuming 500 mg of cinnamon extract daily for 12 weeks decreased a marker of oxidative stress by 14% in adults with prediabetes (4).

This is significant, since oxidative stress has been implicated in the development of nearly every chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes (5).

Summary: Cinnamon does not contain many vitamins or minerals, but it is loaded with antioxidants that decrease oxidative stress. This may potentially protect against diabetes.

It Can Imitate Insulin and Increase Insulin Sensitivity

In those with diabetes, either the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin or cells do not respond to insulin properly, leading to high blood sugar levels.

Cinnamon may help lower blood sugar and fight diabetes by imitating the effects of insulin and increasing glucose transport into cells (6).

It can also help lower blood sugar by increasing insulin sensitivity, making insulin more efficient at moving glucose into cells.

One study of seven men showed taking cinnamon increased insulin sensitivity immediately after consumption, with the effect lasting at least 12 hours (7).

In another study, eight men also demonstrated increases in insulin sensitivity following two weeks of supplementing with cinnamon (8).

Summary: Cinnamon can lower blood sugar by acting like insulin and increasing insulin’s ability to move blood sugar into cells.

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Capsules

It Lowers Fasting Blood Sugar and May Decrease Hemoglobin A1c

Several controlled studies have demonstrated that cinnamon is excellent at reducing fasting blood sugar.

One review of 543 people with type 2 diabetes found taking it was associated with an average decrease of over 24 mg/dL (1.33 mmol/L) (9).

While these study results are pretty clear, studies investigating its effects on hemoglobin A1c, a measure of long-term blood sugar control, have yielded conflicting results.

Some studies report significant decreases in hemoglobin A1c, while others report no effect (9, 10, 11, 12).

The conflicting results may be partially explained by differences in the amount of cinnamon given and prior blood sugar control of participants (9, 13).

Summary: Cinnamon shows promise in lowering blood sugar. However, its effects on hemoglobin A1c are less clear.

It Lowers Blood Sugars After Meals

Depending on the size of the meal and how many carbs it contains, blood sugar levels can rise pretty dramatically after you eat.

These blood sugar fluctuations can increase levels of oxidative stress and inflammation, which tend to do a lot of damage to your body’s cells and put you at risk of chronic disease (14, 15).

Cinnamon can help keep these blood sugar spikes after meals in check. Some researchers say it does this by slowing down the rate at which food empties out of your stomach.

One study found that consuming 1.2 teaspoons (6 grams) of cinnamon with a serving of rice pudding led to slower stomach emptying and lower blood sugar elevations then eating rice pudding without it (16).

Other studies suggest that it may lower blood sugar following meals by blocking digestive enzymes that break down carbs in the small intestine (17, 18).

Summary: Cinnamon can lower blood sugar following meals, possibly by slowing stomach emptying and blocking digestive enzymes.

Pure-Cinnamon---Ceylon-Cinnamon-Quills-x3

It May Lower the Risk of Common Diabetes Complications

This spice does more than lower fasting blood sugar and decrease blood sugar spikes following meals.

It may also lower the risk of common diabetes complications.

People with diabetes have twice the risk of heart disease as people without it. Cinnamon may help lower this risk by improving established risk factors for heart disease (19).

A review of controlled studies in people with type 2 diabetes found that taking cinnamon was associated with an average decrease in “bad” LDL cholesterol of 9.4 mg/dL (0.24 mmol/L) and a decrease in triglycerides of 29.6 mg/dL (0.33 mmol/L) (9).

It also reported an average 1.7 mg/dL (0.044 mmol/L) increase in “good” HDL cholesterol (9).

Furthermore, another study found that supplementing with two grams of cinnamon for 12 weeks significantly lowered both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (11).

Interestingly, diabetes has also been increasingly implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, with many people now referring to Alzheimer’s disease as “type 3 diabetes” (20).

Studies suggest that cinnamon extract may decrease the ability of two proteins — beta-amyloid and tau — to form plaques and tangles, which are routinely linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease (21, 22).

However, this research has only been completed in test tubes and animals. Further studies in humans are needed to confirm these findings.

Summary: Cinnamon may help lower the risk of diseases related to diabetes, such as heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

Ceylon vs Cassia: Which Is Better?

Cinnamon is typically grouped into two different types — Ceylon and Cassia.

Cassia cinnamon can be derived from a few different species of Cinnamomum trees. It’s generally inexpensive and is found in most food products and the spice aisle of your grocery store.

Ceylon cinnamon, on the other hand, is specifically derived from the Cinnamomum verum tree. It’s typically more expensive and is less common than Cassia, but studies have shown that Ceylon cinnamon contains more antioxidants (3).

Because it contains more antioxidants, it’s possible that Ceylon cinnamon may provide more health benefits.

Nevertheless, although several animal and test-tube studies have highlighted the benefits of Ceylon cinnamon, most studies demonstrating health benefits in humans have used the Cassia variety (23).

Summary: Both varieties of cinnamon likely lower blood sugar and fight diabetes, but studies in humans are still needed to confirm that Ceylon provides more benefits than Cassia.

cinnamon-scientific-drawing-800w

Some Should Be Cautious With Cinnamon

Cassia cinnamon is not only lower in antioxidants, it’s also high in a potentially harmful substance called coumarin, an organic substance found in many plants.

Several studies in rats have shown coumarin can be toxic to the liver, leading to concern that it can cause liver damage in humans as well (24).

Accordingly, the European Food Safety Authority has set the tolerable daily intake for coumarin at 0.045 mg per pound (0.1 mg/kg).

Using average coumarin levels for Cassia cinnamon, this would be equivalent to about a half teaspoon (2.5 grams) of Cassia cinnamon per day for a 165-pound (75-kg) individual.

As you can see, Cassia cinnamon is particularly high in coumarin, and you can easily consume more than the upper limit by taking Cassia cinnamon supplements or even eating large amounts of it in foods.

However, Ceylon cinnamon contains much lower amounts of coumarin, and it would be difficult to consume more than the recommended amount of coumarin with this type (25).

Additionally, people with diabetes who take medications or insulin should be careful when adding cinnamon to their daily routine.

The addition of cinnamon on top of your current treatment may put you at risk of low blood sugar, which is known as hypoglycemia.

Hypoglycemia is a potentially life-threatening condition, and it is recommended to talk to your doctor about incorporating cinnamon into your diabetes management.

Lastly, children, pregnant women and others with extensive medical histories should speak with their doctors to see if the benefits of cinnamon outweigh the risks.

Summary: Cassia cinnamon is high in coumarin, which may cause liver damage. Also, people with diabetes should consider the risk of hypoglycemia when consuming large amounts of cinnamon.

How Much Should You Take?

Cinnamon’s benefits for lowering blood sugar have been well-studied.

Yet despite this, no consensus has been reached regarding how much you should consume to reap the benefits while avoiding potential risks.

Studies have typically used 1–6 grams per day, either as a supplement or powder added to foods.

One study reported that the blood sugar of people taking either 1, 3 or 6 grams daily all decreased by the same amount (26).

Given that people on the smallest dose saw the same benefit as those on the largest dose, there may be no need to take large doses.

Additionally, a number of studies have shown that the coumarin content of Cassia cinnamon can vary. Therefore, it would be wise not to exceed 0.5–1 grams of it per day to avoid surpassing the tolerable daily intake of coumarin.

Much less caution can be taken with Ceylon cinnamon. Consuming up to 1.2 teaspoons (6 grams) daily should be safe as far as coumarin content is concerned.

Summary: Limit Cassia cinnamon to 0.5–1 gram per day. Ceylon cinnamon can be consumed in higher amounts, even though it may not be necessary.

The Bottom Line

Many studies have shown that cinnamon has the ability to lower blood sugar and help manage common diabetes complications, among other health benefits.

If you want to take cinnamon supplements or add it to your meals to help lower your blood sugar, it would be wise to use Ceylon instead of Cassia.

It may be more expensive, but Ceylon cinnamon contains more antioxidants and lower amounts of coumarin, which can potentially cause liver damage.

It’s probably best not to exceed 0.5–1 grams of Cassia daily, but taking up to 1.2 teaspoons (6 grams) daily of Ceylon cinnamon should be safe.

Source: healthline.com

New Pure Cinnamon Products from Sundara Botanical

Sundara Botanical are proud to announce its first steps towards commercialisation of its products. A new shopping cart has been added to the Pure Cinnamon Website with a range of excellent products. For your information we provide a list of the products here, a short description and the pricing for these products.

Purchase in Australia will not be available tentatively in ONE MONTH. Please feel free to pre-order, but remember product will not be available for at least one month.

Here are the products:


Ceylon Cinnamon Quills 60g

Pure-Cinnamon---Ceylon-Cinnamon-Quills-x3

Pure Cinnamon direct from Sri Lanka. No Cassia. Raw Cinnamon bark straight from the Ceylon Cinnamon trees ‘Cinnamomum Verum’. Packs sold individually.

$7.95


Cinnamon Capsules 350g

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Capsules

Processed in New Zealand. Highest efficacy and oil content, due to cold climate processing. Contains 90 capsules. Ceylon Cinnamon only – No Cassia. ‘Cinnamomom Verum’.

$19.95


Cinnamon Bark Oil Spray – 20ml

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Bark-Oil

Processed in a cool climate (NZ) ensuring a high efficacy and purity. 20ml bottles (spray).

$20


Cinnamon Powder 50g

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Powder

Ground and processed from Pure Ceylon Cinnamon bark in New Zealand using cold climate processing to ensure higher oil content and efficacy. Promotes sugar metabolism, heart and circulation.

$6.95


Spicy Cinnamon Home Perfume 50ml

Pure-Cinnamon---Spicy-Cinnamon-Home-Perfume

Extract of Cinnamomom Verum. 50ml spray bottle ready to use. Fresh and vibrant. Real Ceylon Cinnamon Extract.

$39.95


Bio Activated Turmeric Capsules 350g

Pure-Turmeric---Bio-Activated-Turmeric-Capsules

Bioactivated Turmeric. High strength. Bio-Available certified Organic Turmeric with MCT from Coconut Oil and Black Pepper. Each capsule contains the equivalent of 4000mg of Turmeric. Manufactured under the code of GMP. 60 Vege Caps per container.

$24.95


Fermented Turmeric Drink 300ml

Pure-Turmeric---Fermented-Turmeric-Drink

Concentrated and Bio-Available with Cinnamon, Ginger and Black Pepper. Manufactured in Australia under the code of GMP. Each bottle contains 300ml

$14.95


Sundara Botanical has just completed the Auckland Food Show. Attendances were again massive, with people sampling a variety of exotic and familiar food types, enjoying a wide panel of cooking and food industry experts, chefs and Providores.

Keep your eyes open for a very special addition to our cinnamon range of products – a whiskey from New Zealand made with Manuka Honey and Cinnamon.

New Pure Cinnamon Products from Sundara Botanical

Sundara Botanical are proud to announce its first steps towards commercialisation of its products. A new shopping cart has been added to the Pure Cinnamon Website with a range of excellent products. For your information we provide a list of the products here, a short description and the pricing for these products.

Purchase in Australia will not be available tentatively in ONE MONTH. Please feel free to pre-order, but remember product will not be available for at least one month.

Here are the products:


Ceylon Cinnamon Quills 60g

Pure-Cinnamon---Ceylon-Cinnamon-Quills-x3

Pure Cinnamon direct from Sri Lanka. No Cassia. Raw Cinnamon bark straight from the Ceylon Cinnamon trees ‘Cinnamomum Verum’. Packs sold individually.

$7.95


Cinnamon Capsules 350g

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Capsules

Processed in New Zealand. Highest efficacy and oil content, due to cold climate processing. Contains 90 capsules. Ceylon Cinnamon only – No Cassia. ‘Cinnamomom Verum’.

$19.95


Cinnamon Bark Oil Spray – 20ml

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Bark-Oil

Processed in a cool climate (NZ) ensuring a high efficacy and purity. 20ml bottles (spray).

$20


Cinnamon Powder 50g

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Powder

Ground and processed from Pure Ceylon Cinnamon bark in New Zealand using cold climate processing to ensure higher oil content and efficacy. Promotes sugar metabolism, heart and circulation.

$6.95


Spicy Cinnamon Home Perfume 50ml

Pure-Cinnamon---Spicy-Cinnamon-Home-Perfume

Extract of Cinnamomom Verum. 50ml spray bottle ready to use. Fresh and vibrant. Real Ceylon Cinnamon Extract.

$39.95


Bio Activated Turmeric Capsules 350g

Pure-Turmeric---Bio-Activated-Turmeric-Capsules

Bioactivated Turmeric. High strength. Bio-Available certified Organic Turmeric with MCT from Coconut Oil and Black Pepper. Each capsule contains the equivalent of 4000mg of Turmeric. Manufactured under the code of GMP. 60 Vege Caps per container.

$24.95


Fermented Turmeric Drink 300ml

Pure-Turmeric---Fermented-Turmeric-Drink

Concentrated and Bio-Available with Cinnamon, Ginger and Black Pepper. Manufactured in Australia under the code of GMP. Each bottle contains 300ml

$14.95


Sundara Botanical has just completed the Auckland Food Show. Attendances were again massive, with people sampling a variety of exotic and familiar food types, enjoying a wide panel of cooking and food industry experts, chefs and Providores.

Keep your eyes open for a very special addition to our cinnamon range of products – a whiskey from New Zealand made with Manuka Honey and Cinnamon.

Pure Cinnamon at the Auckland Food Show

The new range of Pure Cinnamon products from Sundara Botanical is now being launched now at the Auckland Food Show, located at the ASB Showgrounds from the 27th to 30th of July.

Cinnamon is one of the world’s most popular spices. Pure Cinnamon is genuine Cinnamon harvested from the original Cinnamomum Zeylanicum Blume tree variety of Sri Lanka or as it was formerly known, Ceylon.

The Cinnamon from these trees has been sought after for its flavour, fragrance and health giving properties for over 3000 years. Arab Traders jealously guarded their source of this amazing spice for millennia.

Pure Cinnamon is much lower in the toxin courmarin than its near relative, the Cassia tree. Cinnamon from the original Cinnamon trees of Sri Lanka carries less than 0.02% of this substance. Cinnamon extracted from Cassia bark has a much higher 4-8% of courmarin.

Always ask for and select Pure Cinnamon, the original and the best. Use it on your coffee, your Chai Tea, your buns and cookies, in your curries and when serving meats.
Pure Cinnamon – The gift from antiquity, the spice of life.

Pure Cinnamon – Cinnamon Capsules

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Capsules

350mg. Processed in New Zealand. Highest efficacy and oil content, due to cold climate processing. Contains 90 Capsules. Ceylon Cinnamon only – No Cassia. ‘Cinnamomum Verum’.

Pure Cinnamon – Cinnamon Bark Oil

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Bark-Oil

20ml spray bottle. Processed in cool climate (NZ) ensuring high efficacy and purity. Cinnamomum Verum (No Cassia)

Pure Cinnamon – Cinnamon Powder

Pure-Cinnamon---Cinnamon-Powder

50g. Ground and processed from Pure Ceylon Cinnamon bark in New Zealand using cold climate processing to ensure higher oil content and efficacy. Promotes sugar metabolism, Heart and Circulation.

Pure Cinnamon – Spicy Cinnamon Home Perfume

Pure-Cinnamon---Spicy-Cinnamon-Home-Perfume.jpg

50ml spray bottle ready to use. Extract of Cinnamomum Verum. Fresh and Vibrant. Real Ceylon Cinnamon Extract.

Pure Turmeric – Bio Activated Turmeric Capsules

Pure-Turmeric---Bio-Activated-Turmeric-Capsules

350mg. Bioactivated Turmeric. High Strength. Bio-Available Certified Organic Turmeric with MCT from Coconut Oil and Black Pepper. Each capsule contains the equivalent of 4000mg of Turmeric. Manufactured under the code of GMP. 60 Vege Caps per container.

Pure Turmeric – Fermented Turmeric Drink

Pure-Turmeric---Fermented-Turmeric-Drink

Concentrated and Bio-Available with Cinnamon, Ginger, and Black Pepper. Manufactured in Australia under the code of GMP. Each Container contains 300ml.

These products and more will soon also be available for purchase from our website.

 

From the University of Maryland – Turmeric

Overview

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) has been used for 4,000 years to treat a variety of conditions. Studies show that turmeric may help fight infections and some cancers, reduce inflammation, and treat digestive problems.

Many studies have taken place in test tubes and animals. Turmeric may not work as well in humans. Some studies have used an injectable form of curcumin, the active substance in turmeric, and not all studies agree. Finally, some of the studies show conflicting evidence.

Turmeric is widely used in cooking and gives Indian curry its flavor and yellow color. It is also used in mustard and to color butter and cheese. Turmeric has been used in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, to treat digestive and liver problems, skin diseases, and wounds.

Curcumin is also a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants scavenge molecules in the body known as free radicals, which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Antioxidants can fight free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause.

In addition, curcumin lowers the levels of two enzymes in the body that cause inflammation. It also stops platelets from clumping together to form blood clots.

Research suggests that turmeric may be helpful for the following conditions:

Indigestion or Dyspepsia

Curcumin stimulates the gallbladder to produce bile, which some people think may help improve digestion. The German Commission E, which determines which herbs can be safely prescribed in Germany, has approved turmeric for digestive problems. And one double-blind, placebo-controlled study found that turmeric reduced symptoms of bloating and gas in people suffering from indigestion.

Ulcerative colitis

Turmeric may help people with ulcerative colitis stay in remission. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease of the digestive tract where symptoms tend to come and go. In one double-blind, placebo-controlled study, people whose ulcerative colitis was in remission took either curcumin or placebo, along with conventional medical treatment, for 6 months. Those who took curcumin had a significantly lower relapse rate than those who took placebo.

Stomach Ulcers

Turmeric does not seem to help treat stomach ulcers. In fact, there is some evidence that it may increase stomach acid, making existing ulcers worse. (See “Precautions” section.)

Osteoarthritis

Because of turmeric’s ability to reduce inflammation, researchers have wondered if it may help relieve osteoarthritis pain. One study found that people using an Ayurvedic formula of herbs and minerals with turmeric, winter cherry (Withinia somnifera), boswellia (Boswellia serrata), and zinc had less pain and disability. But it’s impossible to know whether turmeric, one of the other supplements, or all of them together, was responsible for the effects.

Heart Disease

Early studies suggested that turmeric may help prevent atherosclerosis, the buildup of plaque that can block arteries and lead to heart attack or stroke. In animal studies, an extract of turmeric lowered cholesterol levels and kept LDL (bad) cholesterol from building up in blood vessels. Because it stops platelets from clumping together, turmeric may also prevent blood clots from building up along the walls of arteries. But a double-blind, placebo-controlled study found that taking curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, at a dose of up to 4 g per day did not improve cholesterol levels.

Cancer

There has been a great deal of research on turmeric’s anti-cancer properties, but results are still very preliminary. Evidence from test tube and animal studies suggests that curcumin may help prevent or treat several types of cancers, including prostate, breast, skin, and colon cancer. Tumeric’s preventive effects may relate to its antioxidant properties, which protect cells from damage. More research is needed. Cancer should be treated with conventional medications. Don’t use alternative therapies alone to treat cancer. If you choose to use complementary therapies along with your cancer treatment, make sure you tell all your doctors.

Bacterial and Viral Infections

Test tube and animal studies suggest turmeric may kill bacteria and viruses, but researchers don’t know whether it would work in people.

Uveitis

A preliminary study suggests curcumin may help treat uveitis, an inflammation of the eye’s iris. Preliminary research suggests that curcumin may be as effective as corticosteroids, the type of medication usually prescribed. More research is needed.

Neurodegenerative Conditions

Tumeric’s powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and circulatory effects may help prevent and treat neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and other conditions.

turmeric-scientific-drawing

Turmeric, Scientific Drawing

Plant Description

A relative of ginger, turmeric is a perennial plant that grows 5 to 6 feet high in the tropical regions of Southern Asia, with trumpet-shaped, dull yellow flowers. Its roots are bulbs that also produce rhizomes, which then produce stems and roots for new plants. Turmeric is fragrant and has a bitter, somewhat sharp taste. Although it grows in many tropical locations, the majority of turmeric is grown in India, where it is used as a main ingredient in curry.

Parts Used

The roots, or rhizomes and bulbs, are used in medicine and food. They are generally boiled and then dried, turning into the familiar yellow powder. Curcumin, the active ingredient, has antioxidant properties. Other substances in this herb have antioxidant properties as well.

Available Forms

Turmeric is available in the following forms:

  • Capsules containing powder
  • Fluid extract
  • Tincture

Bromelain increases the absorption and anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin, so it is often combined with turmeric products.

How to Take It

Pediatric

Turmeric supplements haven’t been studied in children, so there is no recommended dose.

Adult

The following doses are recommended for adults:

  • Cut root: 1.5 to 3 g per day
  • Dried, powdered root: 1 to 3 g per day
  • Standardized powder (curcumin): 400 to 600 mg, 3 times per day
  • Fluid extract (1:1) 30 to 90 drops a day
  • Tincture (1:2): 15 to 30 drops, 4 times per day

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. However, herbs can trigger side effects and may interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider.

Turmeric in food is considered safe.

Turmeric and curcumin supplements are considered safe when taken at the recommended doses. However, taking large amounts of turmeric for long periods of time may cause stomach upset and, in extreme cases, ulcers. People who have gallstones or obstruction of the bile passages should talk to their doctor before taking turmeric.

If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before taking turmeric supplements. Turmeric may lower blood sugar levels. When combined with medications for diabetes, turmeric could cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Although it is safe to eat foods with turmeric, pregnant and breastfeeding women should not take turmeric supplements.

Because turmeric may act like a blood thinner, you should stop taking it at least 2 weeks before surgery. Tell your doctor and surgeon that you have been taking turmeric.

Possible Interactions

If you are being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use turmeric or curcumin in medicinal forms without first talking to your health care provider.

Blood-thinning medications — Turmeric may strengthen the effects of these drugs, raising the risk of bleeding. Blood thinners include warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), and aspirin, among others.

Drugs that reduce stomach acid — Turmeric may interfere with the action of these drugs, increasing the production of stomach acid:

  • Cimetidine (Tagamet)
  • Famotidine (Pepcid)
  • Ranitidine (Zantac)
  • Esomeprazole (Nexium)
  • Omeprazole (Prilosec)
  • Lansoprazole (Prevacid)

Diabetes Medications — Turmeric may strengthen the effects of these drugs, increasing the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Cinnamon: Health Benefits, Nutritional Information

Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the branches of wild trees that belong to the genus “Cinnamomum” – native to the Caribbean, South America, and Southeast Asia.

There are two main types of cinnamon:

  • Ceylon cinnamon
    (Cinnamomum verum), often considered to be “true cinnamon”
    (NB: Far less courmarin than Cassia Cinnamon – no risk of liver damage)
  • Cassia cinnamon or Chinese cinnamon
    (Cinnamomum aromaticum), which originates from southern China, is typically less expensive than Ceylon cinnamon.
    (NB: Serious risk of liver damage in large quantities)

Due to the fact that Ceylon cinnamon is more expensive, most foods in the USA and Western Europe, including sticky buns, breads and other products use the cheaper Cassia cinnamon (dried Cassia bark). These days cinnamon is regarded as the second most popular spice, next to black pepper, in the United States and Europe.

show-images-cinnamon-scoop

Cinnamon has been consumed since 2000 BC in Ancient Egypt, where it was very highly prized (almost considered to be a panacea). In medieval times doctors used cinnamon to treat conditions such as coughing, arthritis and sore throats. (This Cinnamon was sourced from the Kandy Kingdom)

Modern research indicates that cinnamon may have some beneficial health properties. Having said that, it is important to recognise that more research and evidence is needed before we can say conclusively that cinnamon has these health benefits.

Possible health benefits of cinnamon

Cinnamon sticks
Cinnamon sticks or quills

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Cinnamon can be used to help treat muscle spasms, vomiting, diarrhea, infections, the common cold, loss of appetite, and erectile dysfunction (ED).

Cinnamon may lower blood sugar in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, according to Diabetes UK. However high quality research supporting the claim remains scarce.

Fungal infections

According to the National Institutes of Health, cinnamaldehyde – a chemical found in both types of cinnamon – could help fight against bacterial and fungal infections.

Diabetes

Cinnamon may help improve glucose and lipids levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in Diabetics Care.

The study authors concluded that consuming up to 6 grams of cinnamon per day “reduces serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes.” and that “the inclusion of cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.”

In addition, a certain cinnamon extract can reduce fasting blood sugar levels in patients, researchers reported in the European Journal of Clinical Investigation.

show-images-cinnamon-coffee

Alzheimer’s disease

Tel Aviv University researchers discovered that cinnamon may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. According to Prof. Michael Ovadia, of the Department of Zoology at Tel Aviv University, an extract found in cinnamon bark, called CEppt, contains properties that can inhibit the development of the disease.

HIV

A study of Indian medicinal plants revealed that cinnamon may potentially be effective against HIV. According to the study authors, “the most effective extracts against HIV-1 and HIV-2 are respectively Cinnamomum cassia (bark) and Cardiospermum helicacabum (shoot + fruit).”

Multiple Sclerosis

Cinnamon may help stop the destructive process of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a neurological scientist at Rush University Medical Center. Cinnamon could help eliminate the need to take some expensive and unpleasant drugs.

Lower the negative effects of high fat meals

Penn State researchers revealed that diets rich in cinnamon can help reduce the body’s negative responses to eating high-fat meals.

Treating and healing chronic wounds

Research published in the journal ACS Nano suggests that scientists have found a way to package antimicrobial compounds from peppermint and cinnamon in tiny capsules that can both kill biofilms and actively promote healing.

In this video, Dr. Josh Axe discusses the possible health benefits of cinnamon.

 

On the next page we look at the nutritional profile of cinnamon and the health risks associated with consuming it (including the fact that cassia cinnamon in particular contains coumarin). We also discuss Tolerable Daily Intakes and how much cinnamon you can safely eat each day.

Nutritional profile of cinnamon

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, ten grams of ground cinnamon contains:

  • Energy: 24.7 kcal
  • Fat: 0.12 g
  • Carbohydrates: 8.06 g
  • Protein: 0.4 g.

Risks and precautions

Some people who are sensitive to cinnamon may be at an increased risk of liver damage after consuming cinnamon-flavored foods, drinks and food supplements.

This is likely due to the fact that cinnamon contains coumarin, a naturally occurring flavoring substance, which has been linked to liver damage. Cassia cinnamon powder (commonly used in foods in the USA and Western Europe) contains more coumarin than Ceylon cinnamon powder. A 2010 German study found that on average, Cassia cinnamon powder had up to 63 times more coumarin compared to Ceylon cinnamon powder, while Cassia cinnamon sticks contained 18 times more coumarin than Ceylon cinnamon sticks.

How much cinnamon should I eat?

A study carried out in Norway and published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology in 2012 suggested establishing a Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for coumarin of 0.07mg per kg of bodyweight per day. The researchers commented that by sprinkling cinnamon on oatmeal porridge or drinking cinnamon-based tea regularly, adults and children can very easily exceed this amount.

Based upon the conclusion of this study, if the average weight of an American male is 191 pounds (86.6kg), it could mean a maximum Tolerable Daily Intake of 6mg of coumarin. For an average American female (159 pounds or 72.1kg) it could mean a maximum of 5mg of coumarin per day.

In a document published in 2006, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BFR) suggested that 1kg of (cassia) cinnamon powder contains between 2.1 and 4.4g of coumarin. If you estimate that powdered cassia cinnamon weighs approximately 0.56 g/cm3, a kilo of cassia cinnamon powder would equal 362.29 teaspoons. This suggests that a single teaspoon of cassia cinnamon powder could contain between 5.8 and 12.1mg of coumarin (which may be above the Tolerable Daily Intake for a smaller individual).


cinnamon-ccflcr-fotoosvanrobin

Coumarin In Cinnamon Causes Liver Damage In Some People

Sensitive people who consume cinnamon-flavored foods, drinks and food supplements may have a higher risk of liver damage, researchers from the University of Mississippi, USA, and King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, report in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

Cinnamon is one of the most important flavoring agents in foods and drinks, team leader Ikhlas Khan explained. It is the second most popular spice, next to black pepper, in the United States and Europe.

Ceylon cinnamon, also known as “true cinnamon” (cinnamon verum) is very expensive. Therefore, most foods in the USA and Western Europe, including sticky buns, breads and other products use the cheaper Cassia cinnamon (dried Cassia bark).

Cinnamon comes from the bark of trees and is sold as sticks or powder in the country of origin. Ceylon cinnamon grows in Sri Lanka, Madagascar and the Seychelles, while Cassia cinnamon comes from Indonesia and China. Previous studies have linked coumarin intake to liver damage in a small number of sensitive individuals.

True cinnamon has very little coumarin, unlike Cassia cinnamon. A 2010 German study found that on average, Cassia cinnamon powder had up to 63 times more coumarin compared to Ceylon cinnamon powder, while Cassia cinnamon sticks contained 18 times more than Ceylon cinnamon sticks.

The researchers in this latest study also reported that coumarin, a naturally-occurring substance, may cause liver damage in some sensitive people.

Cinnamomum Verum vs Cinnamomum Burmannii

Ceylon cinnamon (left) has much less coumarin than Cassia cinnamon (right)

The authors wrote:

“As found in this study, coumarin was present, sometimes in substantial amounts, in cinnamon-based food supplements and cinnamon-flavored foods.”

According to health officials, consumers cannot tell the difference between Ceylon and Cassia cinnamon in powder form. Cinnamon sticks look different though – Cassia cinnamon sticks consist of a thick layer of rolled bark, while Ceylon cinnamon sticks have thin layers.

Why Cinnamon Is Insanely Good for You

Scientists have long suspected that cinnamon can help prevent blood-sugar spikes and protect against insulin resistance, a risk factor for diabetes. But how, exactly, has remained a mystery—and while some studies have suggested a strong effect, others have been inconclusive.

New research presented Saturday at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology annual meeting suggests a potential mechanism for these effects, lending support to the idea of cinnamon as a metabolic powerhouse. In fact, researchers say, the spice’s benefits may extend far beyond blood-sugar control.

Amy Stockert, associate professor of biochemistry at Ohio Northern University Raabe College of Pharmacy , has been studying cinnamon for years. In 2012, her research showed that type 2 diabetics who took daily cinnamon supplements saw greater reductions in blood sugar than those who took a placebo.

cinnamon-scientific-drawing-800w

Some of these effects lasted even after participants stopped taking the supplements, says Stockert, which suggested that lasting changes had been triggered at the cellular level. “We started to suspect that one of the proteins involved in gene expression was being influenced by cinnamon,” she says.

Her new research, which has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal, focuses on Sirtuin-1 (also called Sirt-1)—a protein that’s active in insulin regulation. “We know that Sirt-1 acts on another protein that affects how glucose is transported,” says, “so it made sense that it might be the key player.”

Scientists know that Sirt-1 is activated by resveratrol, an antioxidant found in red wine that’s been touted for its anti-aging and cholesterol-lowering properties. Cinnamon contains similar compounds, known as phenols, which Stockert thought might also bind to Sirt-1 molecules in the same way. She and her colleagues used a computer model to test this hypothesis, and discovered that the cinnamon phenols had similar, sometimes even stronger interactions with the protein.

show-images-cinnamon-powder

This suggests that the phenols in cinnamon also activate Sirt-1, providing a possible explanation for their beneficial properties. “If that’s true, it means cinnamon is doing more than just lowering blood sugar,” says Stockert. “It’s acting on a protein that affects lipid metabolism, cell growth changes, and the expression of a variety of genes.”

Stockert’s previous research found that people who consumed 1 gram a day of cinnamon saw blood sugar reductions comparable to what would be expected from prescription drugs. But she believes that even smaller quantities—like those used in cooking and seasoning—could also have benefits.

“If cinnamon interacts with this enzyme in the way our model suggests, it could possibly be linked to anti-aging, antioxidant control, a lot of really important health benefits,” she says. “And it shouldn’t take one gram a day to see those effects.”

Stockert recommends buying cinnamon—whole or ground—from reputable spice companies. Her team is now studying the effects of cinnamon on fat cells, and hope to expand their research to muscle and liver cells, as well.

Nancy Farrell, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says that while the research on blood sugar is still inconclusive, it’s encouraging that the topic is being studied further.

show-images-cinnamon-curry

“Cinnamon, in moderation and in daily foods, is generally a good habit,” says Farrell.

Farrell recommends adding cinnamon to oatmeal, toast, butternut squash, chili, and more. She cautions that above-average doses can worsen liver function for people with existing liver damage, and “use of cinnamon supplements should always be discussed with your physician.”

This isn’t the first time cinnamon’s been touted for its health benefits beyond blood sugar control—and it’s certainly not the final word. But given the low risk and reported benefits, it seems a worthwhile addition to your diet, if you like the taste.

Source: Time

How to Differentiate Between Ceylon and Cassia Cinnamon

I have listed all the differences between the two types of cinnamon. The images also illustrate how to identify the real one.

Cinnamon_powder

Cinnamon is one of those herbs which have been used in the traditional treatments and medicines for a wide range of ailments since ancient times. Among many other remedies and combination, real cinnamon and honey is one of the most useful, effective and easy to use home remedies for several conditions.

But….You need to pay attention to a very important fact that all cinnamon is no good. Most people do not know it.

There is a lot of discussion on the internet on topics like benefits, uses, remedies etc of cinnamon. There is either no or little information about the fact that all cinnamon is not good.

There is fake and real, good and bad, toxic and non-toxic! In this article, I have explained all about this and how to choose the right one.

Cassia Cinnamon

This is called cassia, Chinese or Saigon cinnamon. Some people also call it fake cinnamon. It is produced in countries such as Vietnam, China and Indonesia.

It is very hot and by chewing a piece you can feel the pungent taste sizzle and flame in your mouth. It shares some of the characteristics with real cinnamon like being anti-microbial, anti-fungal, blood regulation etc.

The real problem, however, with the fake cinnamon is that it has a high content of coumarin; in fact, nearly 1200 times higher than found in the real herb.

Taking large amount of coumarin is highly toxic and a prolong use may pose several serious health damages.

According to the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) in Germany, coumarin can damage liver and kidneys if taken for longer periods. In case of sensitive individuals, only a small amount can cause damage.

BfR further advises that cassia cinnamon contains high levels of coumarin and should not, therefore, be eaten.

Cassia Cinnamon is a lot cheaper than the real or Ceylon variety. Most cinnamon sold in the supermarket is the Chinese or Cassia variety.

aVNP_9901

Ceylon Cinnamon

This is also called real, sweet or good cinnamon. It is produced in Sri Lanka from the plant called Cinnamomum Zeylanicum.

It is light brown in color and thin and soft in appearance. The sticks are filled like a cigar with several folded layers. The amount of coumarin content is only 0.0004% against 5 % found in Cinnamomum Cassia.

How to Distinguish Between the Two?

In case of ground cinnamon, it is very difficult to distinguish between the two unless you are an expert, especially at sniffing spices. There is no guarantee that the result will be one hundred percent accurate.

However, in case of sticks, it is easier to differentiate between the two. The following table and pictures highlight some of the differences which shall help you to choose the correct type.

Ceylon Cinnamon Cassian Cinnamon
Soft texture, easily broken Hard texture Not easily broken
Soft and Sweet aromatic Pungent and very spicy flavor
Coumarin content 0.0004% Coumarin content 5%
Generally safe Toxic if taken in case of prolonged use
Expensive and not found everywhere A lot cheaper and found in supermarket
Native to Sri Lanka Native to China, India, Vietnam, Indonesia
Light brown in color Dark Brown or reddish in color
Soft in appearance Rough in appearance
Several folds of layer like a cigar only inward folded. Empty cavity

Most bottled or packaged ground cinnamon does not mention its type or origin. It is, therefore, difficult to ascertain its type and origin or the country or plant.

The best course is to identify the sticks and make sure that you are buying the Ceylon variety. Once you get hold of the real “thing” , use your blender to crush it into powder.

The_difference_between_the_two

 

7 Health Benefits of Cinnamon You Need to Know

cinnamon

Once upon a time, cinnamon was more valuable than gold. And while these days, most of us would rather get our hands on 24 karats instead of 24 ounces – a gold bar over a brown stick – this bark-cum-spice has just as much bite as it does bark. The potential health benefits of cinnamon could be stated as nothing short of astonishing.

To help us sort myth from fact, we’ve enlisted the help of several health experts to give us their two cents on one of our favorite spices.

7 Proven Health Benefits of Cinnamon

1. Cinnamon may help treat Type 2 diabetes.

While it’s true that there’s no cure for Type 2 diabetes, cinnamon can be an effective tool in managing the disease.

According to Lori Kenyon Farley, a Certified Nutrition Consultant specializing in wellness, fitness and anti-aging and one of the experts behind Project Juice, cinnamon can help manage this disease in two different ways. “It can reduce blood pressure and have a positive effect on blood markers for those with Type 2 diabetes,” she explains. Cinnamon can also reduce insulin resistance, which, Farley explains, “has been shown to lower fasting blood sugar levels by up to 29%, which can reduce the instance of Type 2 diabetes.”

Shane Ellison, MS, a medicinal chemist and founder of the Sugar Detox, explains how exactly this works. “(Cinnamon) works directly on the muscle cells to force them to remove sugar from the bloodstream, where it is converted to energy,” he says. “It’s even shown to work better than most prescription meds.”

The key is in increasing insulin sensitivity in the body, a sensitivity that, while present at birth for those without type 1 diabetes, slowly decreases as we age and consume more sugar. As a result, sugar floats around in the blood, causing diabetes and other health problems. “Cinnamon, which is completely non-toxic, repairs the receptors so they are once again responsive to insulin,” Ellison explains. “In time, sugar levels normalize due to an increase in insulin sensitivity.”

Add to this the fact that cinnamon has a naturally sweet taste that is devoid of sugar, making it a great addition to foods like plain yogurt as a dessert or snack, and you’ll soon see why we suggest it as a staple for the pantries of those with Type 2 diabetes.

2. Cinnamon can lower your bad cholesterol (or LDL).

Even if you do not suffer from diabetes, you may want to include cinnamon in your diet for many of the same reasons as those who do.

As Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR, the holistic nutritionist for Kate Naumes ND Holistic Wellness in Dallas explains, the positive impact on Type 2 diabetes symptoms is due to a number of factors, notably “improving serum glucose, lowering fasting blood glucose, and reducing triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol.” These are all benefits that can help even those not suffering from diabetes, including those with hereditary cholesterol worries or problems.

“(Cinnamon) also raises HDL (the “good”) cholesterol,” she explains. HDL cholesterol helps remove LDL cholesterol from the body.

And that’s not all. “Regular intake of cinnamon may also help to mitigate the effects of high-fat meals by slowing the increase in blood sugar post-meal,” says Parikh. This means that when cinnamon is added to your diet, the effects of occasional high-fat choices may not be quite as detrimental to your health as they would otherwise be.

3. Cinnamon has antifungal, antibacterial, and even antiviral properties.

Cinnamon has been proven to fight fungal, bacterial, and viral elements in foods, thus preventing spoilage. It’s no surprise that in the Middle Ages, when food spoilage was far more frequent due to lack of refrigeration, many recipes, both sweet and savory, were flavored with the spice.

But these properties of cinnamon do not extend merely to the foods cinnamon seasons. Consumers of cinnamon can benefit from these properties as well, according to our experts, who say cinnamon can be used as part of a treatment for anything from lung problems to the common cold.

Denise Baron, a wellness educator and director of Ayurveda for Modern Living explains that cinnamon can help with all sorts of lung congestion issues. “It helps clear up mucus and encourages circulation,” she explains, thus lending its powers to everything from a simple seasonal cough to bronchitis, when used in tandem with other remedies.

But perhaps the most surprising use of cinnamon is in combatting viruses, and not just the common cold. “Research shows that cinnamon extract may help fight the HIV virus by preventing the virus from entering cells,” says Parikh. “Therefore, cinnamon extract could potentially contribute to the management of HIV.”

4. Cinnamon can help treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases are two neurological conditions that, for the moment, are incurable. An enormous part of treating these diseases is therefore in symptom management, and this can be boosted with the addition of cinnamon to a regular regime.

“Cinnamon has been shown to help neurons and improve motor function in those suffering from Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s,” explains Farley. These contributions can help sufferers of these two diseases continue their regular routines with far less impediment.

5. Cinnamon may have anti-carcinogenic properties.

Many superfoods are attributed with anti-carcinogenic properties, but it’s important not to jump from super food to super power. Parikh explains why it’s important not to get carried away.

“Evidence suggests that cinnamon may have anti-carcinogenic effects as well, although the research thus far is limited to animal studies,” she says. “These experiments demonstrate that cinnamon extract slows the growth of cancer cells and induces cancerous cell death.”

If these properties do extend to humans, then cinnamon may in fact be able to slow growth and kill cancerous cells. And even if these properties do not extend to a cure or treatment for cancer in humans, other characteristics of cinnamon, including the presence of antioxidants and free radicals, can contribute to its possible anti-carcinogenic effects.

6. Cinnamon has anti-inflammatory properties.

Consumption of cinnamon can reduce both systemic and specific inflammation. The former is particularly important in the Western world, according to Parekh.

She says that in the West, “Systemic inflammation is a prominent problem that has led to the rise in chronic disease.” By adding cinnamon to a regular diet, this systemic inflammation can be reduced significantly.”

Specific inflammation reduction means that consumption of cinnamon can help treat certain types of pain and headaches, as well as arthritis pain. It plays a double role in this particular type of pain, according to Baron, as cinnamon can also boost circulation. “With circulation problems such as Raynaud’s syndrome or arthritis, this helps stimulate and push circulation to the joints,” she explains.

7. Cinnamon can help manage PCOS.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a problem with numerous symptoms that need to be managed, and cinnamon can be a key element of this management due to a number of characteristics.

First would be the management of insulin resistance in women with PCOS, which can contribute to weight gain. “A recent pilot study found that cinnamon reduced insulin resistance in women with PCOS,” explains Parekh, extending cinnamon’s recommended consumption from diabetes sufferers to anyone with an insulin resistance problem.

“Cinnamon can also help mitigate heavy menstrual bleeding associated with common conditions of female health, such as endometriosis, menorrhagia, and uterine fibroids.”

It’s possible we’re just brushing the surface here. After all, Chinese medicine and Ayurveda have long revered cinnamon for its near superpowers, using it to treat things such as colds, indigestion and cramps, not to mention for its anti-clotting properties as well as attributes for cognitive function and memory. These societies also believed cinnamon could improve energy, vitality and circulation. It’s no wonder we’ve dubbed it a superfood!

shutterstock_133083593

Why is Cinnamon So Good for You?

How does such a little spice have so much power?

Many of cinnamon’s fantastic properties come from one substance, something called cinnamaldehyde, which is naturally present in cinnamon. According to Parikh, cinnamaldehyde is the source many of the antifungal and antibacterial properties that make cinnamon such a great addition to your diet.

But that’s not all. “Cinnamon’s high concentration of antioxidants can help protect the body from damage from free radicals and reduce inflammation, reducing risk of cancer and other diseases,” explains Farley.

The combination of cinnamaldehyde, antioxidants and cinnamon’s high fiber content are some of the characteristics that lend it its incredible positive effects on the human body.

How to Include Cinnamon in Your Diet

Even with all this evidence pointing to the wonders of cinnamon, we are absolutely not advocating you start guzzling it – it has been found to be toxic in large doses.

We are, however, wholeheartedly encouraging a little pinch (or stick) here and there in places you might otherwise have overlooked (in your tea or coffee, added to savory dishes, etc.) – if not for your overall health, for its undeniably enchanting aroma and flavor.

And while we all have fell victim to the irresistible smells wafting through an otherwise bleak airport experience, this does not make Cinnabon a free-for-all. Not only is it much better to use cinnamon in healthy recipes, but you’re going to want to source your cinnamon somewhere you trust for several reasons.

What Kind of Cinnamon Should I Use?

Not all cinnamons were created equal, so be careful what you buy.

“Nearly all the cinnamon in the grocery stores and health food stores is a cousin of true cinnamon,” explains Christina Major, a MS Holistic Nutritionist and Herbalist and the Health Recovery Expert of Crystal Holistic Health.

Cinnamomum cassia, or Chinese cinnamon, has a very similar flavor and color, but it does not have the same health benefits,” she explains. “Only Cinnamomum verum provides the health benefits, and this is an expensive spice that is often illicitly substituted with Cinnamomum cassia.”

When you are perusing the supermarket shelves, you’ll likely see Cinnamomum cassia sold as Chinese or Cassia cinnamon, whereas Cinnamomum verum will be sold as Ceylon cinnamon. According to our experts, you should opt for the latter.

If you do have Cassia cinnamon on your shelf already, you can try integrating it into your diet as well, but bear in mind a few important notes.

You likely will not find that the same benefits outlined with regards to Ceylon cinnamon hold true with Cassia. “That’s why most supplements and home remedies don’t work,” explains Major. “There isn’t enough active ingredient, because the manufacturer didn’t use the right cinnamon.”

Farley also warns that the Cassia variety should be consumed in very small doses. “Not more than 2 tsp. per day,” she suggests, “Since it has a higher concentration of courmarin, which can be harmful in large doses.” Courmarin can cause liver toxicity and have blood-thinning properties, so be sure to talk to your doctor before adding this or any sort of cinnamon to your diet if you are on blood thinners or liver medication.

If you’d like to give a small amount of cinnamon a try, here’s a good starting point.  If you prefer to buy in bulk to save money, click here for 1lb of cinnamon.

How Much Cinnamon Should I Eat?

Once you’ve got your hands on some true Ceylon cinnamon, the recommended dosage, according to the U.S. Department of Health, is up to 6 grams daily for 6 weeks or fewer.

“I would suggest a week rest after the 6 weeks, before beginning again,” says Farley. “Turmeric can be taken during the rest week since it has similar benefits.”

You can also reduce your cinnamon consumption to 5 days a week without a rest week, says Parehk, though she – and we – urge anyone starting a new supplement regimen to consult with a qualified practitioner first and to be very careful of over-consumption of cinnamon, no matter which variety you have. Overconsumption of cinnamon or even a rapid increase of consumption of cinnamon can have some adverse effects.

One, explains Dizon, is that cinnamon’s anti-bacterial properties do not distinguish between good or bad bacteria in the gut, meaning that you could find yourself facing some cinnamon-related digestive issues. “Incorporate fermented foods to replenish your stomach with good bacteria,” she suggests.

Our experts also warn against incorporating too much cinnamon into your diet if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or have a heavy menstrual cycle. If any of these things apply to you, please see a medical professional before adding cinnamon to your diet.

shutterstock_305927837

How Should I Add Cinnamon to My Diet?

Cinnamon can be purchased in several forms, including ground powder, cinnamon sticks, cinnamon bark oil, or even capsules.

Jane Dizon, a nurse and health and fitness enthusiast behind Health and Fitness, has a few suggestions for how to add cinnamon to your diet. “You could add half to one teaspoon of cinnamon powder to your coffee, or sprinkle some on your fruit platter. It’s also great with baked sweet potatoes, oatmeals and apple cider.”

And cinnamon doesn’t always have to be used alone. “You can combine ginger and cardamom with cinnamon if you have a sluggish digestive system,” explains Baron.

You don’t even have to eat your cinnamon to take advantage of it. Dizon suggests cinnamon-scented candles to boost brain function, and Baron makes a homemade toothpaste with cinnamon, nutmeg, baking soda and cinnamon oil. She also suggests a cinnamon and oatmeal face mask for acne.

Here are just a few of our favorite recipes for including cinnamon in your diet:

What are your favorite ways to eat cinnamon?


Source: organicauthority.com